Python Examples

Basic Programs:

  1. Python program to add two numbers
  2. Maximum of two numbers in Python
  3. Python Program for factorial of a number
  4. Python Program for simple interest
  5. Python Program for compound interest
  6. Python Program to check Armstrong Number
  7. Python Program for Program to find area of a circle
  8. Python program to print all Prime numbers in an Interval
  9. Python program to check whether a number is Prime or not
  10. Python Program for n-th Fibonacci number
  11. Python Program for How to check if a given number is Fibonacci number?
  12. Python Program for n\’th multiple of a number in Fibonacci Series
  13. Program to print ASCII Value of a character
  14. Python Program for Sum of squares of first n natural numbers
  15. Python Program for cube sum of first n natural numbers

Array Programs:

  1. Python Program to find sum of array
  2. Python Program to find largest element in an array
  3. Python Program for array rotation
  4. Python Program for Reversal algorithm for array rotation
  5. Python Program to Split the array and add the first part to the end
  6. Python Program for Find reminder of array multiplication divided by n
  7. Python Program to check if given array is Monotonic

List Programs:

  1. Python program to interchange first and last elements in a list
  2. Python program to swap two elements in a list
  3. Python | Ways to find length of list
  4. Python | Ways to check if element exists in list
  5. Different ways to clear a list in Python
  6. Python | Reversing a List
  7. Python program to find sum of elements in list
  8. Python | Multiply all numbers in the list
  9. Python program to find smallest number in a list
  10. Python program to find largest number in a list
  11. Python program to find second largest number in a list
  12. Python program to find N largest elements from a list
  13. Python program to print even numbers in a list
  14. Python program to print odd numbers in a List
  15. Python program to print all even numbers in a range
  16. Python program to print all odd numbers in a range
  17. Python program to print positive numbers in a list
  18. Python program to print negative numbers in a list
  19. Python program to print all positive numbers in a range
  20. Python program to print all negative numbers in a range
  21. Remove multiple elements from a list in Python
  22. Python – Remove empty List from List
  23. Python | Cloning or Copying a list
  24. Python | Count occurrences of an element in a list
  25. Python | Remove empty tuples from a list
  26. Python | Program to print duplicates from a list of integers
  27. Python program to find Cumulative sum of a list
  28. Python | Sum of number digits in List
  29. Break a list into chunks of size N in Python
  30. Python | Sort the values of first list using second list

Python – INTERVIEW QUESTIONS – 2020 (with answer and algorithm analysis)

Ex1: Merging two sorted list

We have two sorted lists, and we want to write a function to merge the two lists into one sorted list:

a = [3, 4, 6, 10, 11, 18]
b = [1, 5, 7, 12, 13, 19, 21]

Here is our code:

a = [3, 4, 6, 10, 11, 18]
b = [1, 5, 7, 12, 13, 19, 21]
c = []

while a and b:
    if a[0] < b[0]:
        c.append(a.pop(0))
    else:
        c.append(b.pop(0))
        
# either a or b could still be non-empty
print c + a + b

The output:

[1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 21]

A little bit more compact version using list.extend():

a = [3, 4, 6, 10, 11, 18]
b = [1, 5, 7, 12, 13, 19, 21]

a.extend(b)
c = sorted(a)
print c

Note that the list.extend() is different from list.append():

[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, [2, 4, 6]]  # a.append(b)
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 2, 4, 6]    # a.extend(b)

Ex2: Get word frequency – initializing dictionary

We’ll see two ways of initializing dictionary by solving word frequency problem.

#!/usr/bin/python
ss = """Nory was a Catholic because her mother was a Catholic, 
and Nory's mother was a Catholic because her father was a Catholic, 
and her father was a Catholic because his mother was a Catholic, 
or had been."""

words = ss.split()
d = {}.fromkeys(words,0)

# or we can use this to initialize a dict
d = {x:0 for x in words}

for w in words:
    d[w] += 1
print d

ds = sorted(d.items(), key=lambda x:x[1], reverse=True)
print(ds)

# or we can use this for the key
import operator
ds2 = sorted(d.items(), key=operator.itemgetter(1), reverse=True)
print(ds2)

We initialized the dictionary with 0 using fromkeys(), and the output should look like this:

{'a': 6, 'Catholic': 3, 'and': 2, 'because': 3, 'her': 3, 'had': 1, 'Nory': 1, 'father': 2, 
"Nory's": 1, 'his': 1, 'been.': 1, 'mother': 3, 'was': 6, 'or': 1, 'Catholic,': 3}

Here is another way of initializing a dictionary:

d = {}
for w in ss.split():
    d[w] = d.get(w,0) + 1
print d

The third way of dictionary initialization using collections.defaultdict(int) which is convenient for counting:

from collections import defaultdict
d = defaultdict(int)
for w in words:
    d[w] += 1
print d

Initializing dictionary with list – I

Sometimes we may want to construct dictionary whose values are lists.

In the following example, we make a dictionary like {‘Country’: [cities,…], }:

cities = {'San Francisco': 'US', 'London':'UK',
        'Manchester':'UK', 'Paris':'France',
        'Los Angeles':'US', 'Seoul':'Korea'}

# => {'US':['San Francisco', 'Los Angeles'], 'UK':[,], ...}

from collections import defaultdict
# using collections.defaultdict()
d1 = defaultdict(list) # initialize dict with list
for k,v in cities.items():
    d1[v].append(k)
print d1

# using dict.setdefault(key, default=None)
d2 = {}
for k,v in cities.items():
       d2.setdefault(v,[]).append(k)
print d2

Output:

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {'Korea': ['Seoul'], 'US': ['Los Angeles', 'San Francisco'], 'UK': ['Manchester', 'London'], 'France': ['Paris']})
{'Korea': ['Seoul'], 'US': ['Los Angeles', 'San Francisco'], 'UK': ['Manchester', 'London'], 'France': ['Paris']}

Or we can use this code:

#! /usr/bin/python

cities = {'San Francisco': 'US', 'London':'UK',
        'Manchester':'UK', 'Paris':'France',
        'Los Angeles':'US', 'Seoul':'Korea'}

# => {'US':['San Francisco', 'Los Angeles'], 'UK':[,], ...}

a = [v for k,v in cities.items()]
print(a)

ds = {<strong>x:[]</strong> for x in set(a)}
print(ds)

for k,v in cities.items():
	ds[v].append(k)

print(ds)    

Output:

['UK', 'Korea', 'France', 'UK', 'US', 'US']
{'Korea': [], 'UK': [], 'US': [], 'France': []}
{'Korea': ['Seoul'], 'UK': ['Manchester', 'London'], 'US': ['Los Angeles', 'San Francisco'], 'France': ['Paris']}    

Initializing dictionary with list – II

A little bit simpler problem. We have a list of numbers:

L = [1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024,32768,65536,4294967296]

We want to make a dictionary with the number of digits as the key and list of numbers the value:

 {1: [1, 2, 4, 8], 2: [16, 32, 64], 3: [128, 256, 512], 4: [1024], 5: [32768, 65536], 10: [4294967296]})

The code looks like this:

L = [1,2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024,32768,65536,4294967296]

from collections import defaultdict
d = defaultdict(list)
for i in L:
    d[len(str(i))].append(i)
print d
print {k:v for k,v in d.items()}

Output:

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {1: [1, 2, 4, 8], 2: [16, 32, 64], 3: [128, 256, 512], 4: [1024], 5: [32768, 65536], 10: [4294967296]})
{1: [1, 2, 4, 8], 2: [16, 32, 64], 3: [128, 256, 512], 4: [1024], 5: [32768, 65536], 10: [4294967296]}

More examples: Word Frequency


map, filter, and reduce

Using map, filter, reduce, write a code that create a list of (n)**2 for range(10) for even integers:

l = [x for x in range(10) if x % 2 == 0]
print l

m = filter(lambda x:x % 2 == 0, [x for x in range(10)] )
# m = list( filter(lambda x:x % 2 == 0, [x for x in range(10)] ) ) # python3
print m

o = map(lambda x: x**2, m)
# o = list( map(lambda x: x**2, m) ) # python3
print o


p = reduce(lambda x,y:x+y, o)
# import functools . # python3
# p = functools.reduce(lambda x,y:x+y, o) # python3
print p

Output:

[0, 2, 4, 6, 8]
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8]
[0, 4, 16, 36, 64]
120


Write a function f()

Q: We have the following code with unknown function f(). In f(), we do not want to use return, instead, we may want to use generator.

for x in f(5):
    print x,

The output looks like this:

0 1 8 27 64

Write a function f() so that we can have the output above.

We may use the following f() to get the same output:

def f(n):
   return [x**3 for x in range(5)]

But we want to use generator not using return.

So, the answer should look like this:

def f(n):
    for x in range(n):
        yield x**3

The yield enables a function to comeback where it left off when it is called again. This is the critical difference from a regular function. A regular function cannot comes back where it left off. The yield keyword helps a function to remember its state.

A generator function is a way to create an iterator. A new generator object is created and returned each time we call a generator function. A generator yields the values one at a time, which requires less memory and allows the caller to get started processing the first few values immediately.

Another example of using yield:

Let’s build the primes() function so that I fills the n one at a time, and comes back to primes() function until n > 100.

def isPrime(n):
   if n == 1:
      return False
   for t in range(2,n):
      if n % t == 0:
         return False
   return True

for n in primes():
   print n,

The print out from the for-loop should look like this:

2 3 5 7 11 ... 83 89 97

Here is the primes() function:

def primes(n=1):
   while n < 100:
      # yields n instead of returns n
      if isPrime(n): yield n
      # next call it will increment n by 1
      n += 1


Here is a more practical sample of code which I used for Natural Language Processing(NLP).

Suppose we have a huge data file that has hundred millions of lines. So, it may well exceed our computer’s memory. In this case, we may want to take so called out-of-core approach: we process data in batch (partially, one by one) rather than process it at once. This saves us from the memory issue when we deal with big data set.

So, we want to use yield command. In the following sample, we do process three lines at a time.

Here is the code:

def stream_docs(path):
    with open(path, 'rb') as lines:
        for line in lines:
            text, label = line[:-3], line[-3:-1]
            yield text, label
            
def get_minibatch(doc_stream, size):
    docs, y = [], []
    try:
        for _ in range(size):
            text, label = next(doc_stream)
            docs.append(text)
            y.append(label)
    except StopIteration:
        return None, None
    return docs, y

doc_stream = stream_docs(path='./test.txt')

for _ in range(100):
    X_train, y_train = get_minibatch(doc_stream, size=3)
    if not X_train:
        break
    print 'X_train, y_train=', X_train, y_train

The yield makes the stream_docs() to return a generator which is always an iterator:

generators-iterators-iterables.png

(note) – iterable: strings, lists, tuples, dictionaries, and sets are all iterable objects (containers) which we can get an iterator from. A range() functiuon also returns iterable object. All these objects have an iter() method which is used to get an iterator.

If we comment out the “yield” line, we get “TypeError: NoneType object is not an iterator” at the next(doc_stream) in “get_minibatch()” function.

Output from the code:

X_train, y_train= ['line-a', 'line-b', 'line-c'] [' 1', ' 2', ' 3']
X_train, y_train= ['line-d', 'line-e', 'line-f'] [' 4', ' 5', ' 6']
X_train, y_train= ['line-g', 'line-h', 'line-i'] [' 7', ' 8', ' 9']
X_train, y_train= ['line-j ', 'line-k ', 'line-k '] ['10', '11', '12']

The input used in the code looks like this:

line-a 1
line-b 2
line-c 3
line-d 4
line-e 5
line-f 6
line-g 7
line-h 8
line-i 9
line-j 10
line-k 11
line-k 12

The digit at the end of each line is used as a class label(y_train), so we want to keep it separate from the rest of the text(X_train).


For more information about yield or generator, please visit:

  1. The yield keyword
  2. Generator Functions and Expressions

What is __init__.py?

It is used to import a module in a directory, which is called package import.

If we have a module, dir1/dir2/mod.py, we put __init__.py in each directories so that we can import the mod like this:

import dir1.dir2.mod

The __init__.py is usually an empty py file. The hierarchy gives us a convenient way of organizing the files in a large system.

Build a string with the numbers from 0 to 100, “0123456789101112…”

We may want to use str.join rather than appending a number every time.

>>> ''.join([`x` for x in xrange(101)])
'0123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263646566676869707172737475767778798081828384858687888990919293949596979899100'
>>> 

Note that the (`) is a backquote not a regiular single quote ():

>>> type(1)
<type 'int'>
>>> type(`1`)
<type 'str'>

Note that we cannot use double quote(“) or single quote(‘) to make n a string:

>>> type("1")
<type 'str'>

>>> ''.join(["n" for n in range(10)])
'nnnnnnnnnn'
>>> ''.join(['n' for n in range(10)])
'nnnnnnnnnn'

>>> n = 1
>>> print `n`
1
>>> print "n"
n

Note: join() returns a string in which the string elements of sequence have been joined by string separator.

We can use str(x) instead:

>>> ''.join([str(x) for x in range(10)])
'0123456789'

Also, since the xrange() is replaced with range in Python 3.x, we should use range() instead for compatibility.

Basic file processing: Printing contents of a file.

try:
    with open('filename','r') as f:
        print f.read()
except IOError:
    print "No such file exists"

How can we get home directory using ‘~’ in Python?

We need to import os module, and add just one line:

import os
print os.path.expanduser('~')

Output:

/home/k

The usage of os.path.dirname() & os.path.basename()

For example, we have the path like this, /home/k/TEST/PYTHON/p.py:

We can get the dir and file using the following:

First, we need to import os module:

>>> import os

Then, we do:

>>> os.path.dirname('/home/k/TEST/PYTHON/p.py')
'/home/k/TEST/PYTHON'

>>> os.path.basename('/home/k/TEST/PYTHON/p.py')
'p.py'

Or we can get them at once in tuple using os.path.split():

>>> os.path.split('/home/k/TEST/PYTHON/p.py')
('/home/k/TEST/PYTHON', 'p.py')

If we want to combine and make a full path:

>>> os.path.join('/home/k/TEST/PYTHON', 'p.py')
'/home/k/TEST/PYTHON/p.py'

Default Libraries

We should be able to answer the questions about the standard library.
Such as “Do you know if there’s a standard library for recursive file renaming?”,
or “In which library would you use for regular expression?”

  1. os: operating system support
    os.path: Common pathname manipulations:
    >>> import os >>> print(os.getcwd()) C:\Python32 >>> cur_dir = os.curdir >>> print(cur_dir) . >>> scripts_dir = os.path.join(os.curdir, ‘Tools\Scripts’) >>> print(scripts_dir) .\Tools\Scripts >>> diff_py = os.path.join(scripts_dir, ‘diff.py’) >>> print(diff_py) .\Tools\Scripts\diff.py >>> os.path.basename(diff_py) ‘ diff.py’ >>> os.path.splitext(diff_py) (‘.\\Tools\\Scripts\\diff’, ‘.py’)
    The os.path.join() function constructs a pathname out of one or more partial pathnames. In this case, it simply concatenates strings.Other convenient ones are: dirname() and basename(), which are the 1st and 2nd element of split(), respectively:>>> import os >>> print(os.getcwd()) C:\TEST\dirA\dirB\dirC >>> print(os.path.dirname(os.getcwd())) C:\TEST\dirA\dirB >>> print(os.path.basename(os.getcwd())) dirC >>> print(os.path.split(os.getcwd())) (‘C:\\TEST\\dirA\\dirB’, ‘dirC’) >>> pathname = os.path.join(os.getcwd(),’myfile.py’) >>> pathname ‘C:\\TEST\\dirA\\dirB\\dirC\\myfile.py’ >>> (dirname, filename) = os.path.split(pathname) >>> dirname ‘C:\\TEST\\dirA\\dirB\\dirC’ >>> filename ‘myfile.py’
    The split function splits a full pathname and returns a tuple containing the path and filename. We could use multi-variable assignment to return multiple values from a function. The os.path.split() function does exactly that. We assign the return value of the split function into a tuple of two variables. Each variable receives the value of the corresponding element of the returned tuple.The first variable, dirname, receives the value of the first element of the tuple returned from the os.path.split() function, the file path. The second variable, filename, receives the value of the second element of the tuple returned from the os.path.split() function, the filename.os.path also contains the os.path.splitext() function, which splits a filename and returns a tuple containing the filename and the file extension.The os.path.expanduser() function :>>> print(os.path.expanduser(‘~’)) C:\Users\KHong
    will expand a pathname that uses ~ to represent the current user’s home directory. This works on any platform where users have a home directory, including Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows. The returned path does not have a trailing slash, but the os.path.join() function doesn’t mind:
  2. re: Regular expression operations
    Visit Regular Expressions with Python
  3. itertools: Functions creating iterators for efficient looping.
    It includes permutations, combinations and other useful iterables.>>> [x for x in itertools.permutations(‘123’)] [(‘1’, ‘2’, ‘3’), (‘1’, ‘3’, ‘2’), (‘2’, ‘1’, ‘3’), (‘2’, ‘3’, ‘1’), (‘3’, ‘1’, ‘2’), (‘3’, ‘2’, ‘1’)] >>> [x for x in itertools.permutations(‘123’,2)] [(‘1’, ‘2’), (‘1’, ‘3’), (‘2’, ‘1’), (‘2’, ‘3’), (‘3’, ‘1’), (‘3’, ‘2’)] >>>

range vs xrange

>>> sum(range(1,101))
5050
>>> sum(xrange(1,101))
5050
>>> 

range() returns a list to the sum function containing all the numbers from 1 to 100. But xrange() returns an iterator rather than a list, which makes it more lighter in terms of memory use as shown below.

>>> range(1,5)
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> xrange(1,5)
xrange(1, 5)
>>> 

Note: Since the xrange() is replaced with range in Python 3.x, we should use range() instead for compatibility. The range() in Python 3.x just returns iterator. That means it does not produce the results in memory any more, and if we want to get list from range(), we need to force it to do so: list(range(…)).

Iterators

Python defines several iterator objects to support iteration over general and specific sequence types, dictionaries.

Any object with a __next__() method to advance to a next result is considered iterator. Note that if an object has __iter__() method, we call the object iterable.

iterators-iterables.png

For more info, please visit
http://www.bogotobogo.com/python/python_iterators.php.

Generators

Generators allow us to declare a function that behaves like an iterator, i.e. it can be used in a for loop. It’s a function type generator, but there is another type of generator that may be more familiar to us – expression type generator used in list comprehension:

>>> # List comprehension makes a list
>>> [ x ** 3 for x in range(5)]
[0, 1, 8, 27, 64]
>>> 
>>> # Generator expression makes an iterable
>>> (x ** 3 for x in range(5))
<generator object <genexpr> at 0x000000000315F678>

With the generator expression, we can just wrap it with list() call:

>>> list(x ** 3 for x in range(5))
[0, 1, 8, 27, 64]

Since every generator is an iterator, we can use next() to get the values:

>>> generator = (x ** 3 for x in range(5))
>>> generator.next()
0
>>> generator.next()
1
>>> generator.next()
8
>>> generator.next()
27

For more information about generators, please visit:
http://www.bogotobogo.com/python/python_generators.php

Manipulating functions as first-class objects

Functions as first-class objects?
That means we can pass them around as objects and can manipulate them. In other words, most of the times, this just means we can pass these first-class citizens as arguments to functions, or return them from functions. Everything in Python is a proper object. Even things that are “primitive types” in other languages:

>>> dir (100)
['__abs__', '__add__', '__and__', '__class__', '__cmp__', '__coerce__', 
'__delattr__', '__div__', '__divmod__', '__doc__', '__float__', 
....
 'numerator', 'real']
>>> 

Functions have attributes and can be referenced and assigned to variables.

>>> def one(arg):
	'''I am a function returning arg I received.'''
	return arg

>>> one(1)
1
>>> one
<function one at 0x0284AA70>
>>> One = one
>>> One
<function one at 0x0284AA70>
>>> one.__doc__
'I am a function returning arg I received.'
>>> 

docstrings vs comments

docstring is the documentation string for a function. We use it as shown below:

function_name.__doc__

We can declare it like this:

def my_function():
    """our docstring"""

or:

def my_function():
    '''our docstring'''

Everything between the triple quotes (with double quotes, “”” or with single quotes,”’) is the function’s docstring, which documents what the function does. A docstring, if it exists, must be the first thing defined in a function. In other words, it should appear on the next line after the function declaration. We don’t technically need to give our function a docstring, but we always should. The docstring will be available at runtime as an attribute of the function.

Writing documentation for our program this way makes the code more readable. We can also use comments for clarification of what the code is doing. In general, docstrings are for documentation, comments are for a code reader.

Monkey-patching

The origin of monkey-patch according to wiki is :
“The term monkey patch seems to have come from an earlier term, guerrilla patch, which referred to changing code sneakily at runtime. The word guerrilla, homophonous with gorilla, became monkey, possibly to make the patch sound less intimidating.”

In Python, the term monkey patch only refers to dynamic modifications of a class or module at runtime, motivated by the intent to patch existing third-party code as a workaround to a bug or feature which does not act as we desire.

We have a module called m.py like this:

# m.py
class MyClass:
    def f(self):
        print "f()"

Then, if we run the monkey-patch testing like this:

>>> import m
>>> def monkey_f(self):
	print "monkey_f()"

	
>>> m.MyClass.f = monkey_f
>>> obj = m.MyClass()
>>> obj.f()
monkey_f()
>>> 

As we can see, we did make some changes in the behavior of f() in MyClass using the function we defined, monkey_f(), outside of the module m.

It is a risky thing to do, but sometimes we need this trick, such as testing.

pdb – The Python Debugger

The module pdb defines an interactive source code debugger for Python programs. It supports setting (conditional) breakpoints and single stepping at the source line level, inspection of stack frames, source code listing, and evaluation of arbitrary Python code in the context of any stack frame. It also supports post-mortem debugging and can be called under program control.

Using Lambda

Python supports the creation of anonymous functions (i.e. functions that are not bound to a name) at runtime, using a construct called lambda. This is not exactly the same as lambda in functional programming languages such as Lisp, but it is a very powerful concept that’s well integrated into Python and is often used in conjunction with typical functional concepts like filter()map() and reduce().

The following code shows the difference between a normal function definition, func and a lambda function, lamb:

def func(x): return x ** 3

>>> print(func(5))
125
>>> 
>>> lamb = lambda x: x ** 3
>>> print(lamb(5))
125
>>> 

As we can see, func() and lamb() do exactly the same and can be used in the same ways. Note that the lambda definition does not include a return statement — it always contains an expression which is returned. Also note that we can put a lambda definition anywhere a function is expected, and we don’t have to assign it to a variable at all.

The lambda‘s general form is :

lambda arg1, arg2, ...argN : expression using arguments

Function objects returned by running lambda expressions work exactly the same as those created and assigned by defs. However, there are a few differences that make lambda useful in specialized roles:

  1. lambda is an expression, not a statement.
    Because of this, a lambda can appear in places a def is not allowed. For example, places like inside a list literal, or a function call’s arguments. As an expression, lambda returns a value that can optionally be assigned a name. In contrast, the def statement always assigns the new function to the name in the header, instead of returning is as a result.
  2. lambda’s body is a single expression, not a block of statements.
    The lambda‘s body is similar to what we’d put in a def body’s return statement. We simply type the result as an expression instead of explicitly returning it. Because it is limited to an expression, a lambda is less general that a def. We can only squeeze design, to limit program nesting. lambda is designed for coding simple functions, and def handles larger tasks.
>>> 
>>> def f(x, y, z): return x + y + z

>>> f(2, 30, 400)
432

We can achieve the same effect with lambda expression by explicitly assigning its result to a name through which we can call the function later:

>>> 
>>> f = lambda x, y, z: x + y + z
>>> f(2, 30, 400)
432
>>> 

Here, the function object the lambda expression creates is assigned to f. This is how def works, too. But in def, its assignment is an automatic must.

For more, please go to Functions lambda

Properties vs Getters/Setters

We have more detailed discussion in Classes and Instances – Method: Properties.

In general, properties are more flexible than attributes. That’s because we can define functions that describe what is supposed to happen when we need setting, getting or deleting them. If we don’t need this additional flexibility, we may just use attributes since they are easier to declare and faster.

However, when we convert an attribute into a property, we just define some getter and setter that we attach to it, that will hook the data access. Then, we don’t need to rewrite the rest of our code, the way for accessing the data is the same, whatever our attribute is a property or not.

classmethod vs staticmethod

From the official Python documentation on @classmethod:

classmethod(function)
    Return a class method for function.

    A class method receives the class as implicit first argument, 
    just like an instance method receives the instance. 
    To declare a class method, use this idiom:

class C:
    @classmethod
    def f(cls, arg1, arg2, ...): ...

The @classmethod form is a function decorator.
It can be called either on the class (such as C.f()) or on an instance (such as C().f()). 
The instance is ignored except for its class. If a class method is called for a derived class, 
the derived class object is passed as the implied first argument.

And for the @staticmethodthe python doc describes it as below:

staticmethod(function)
    Return a static method for function.

    A static method does not receive an implicit first argument. 
    To declare a static method, use this idiom:

class C:
    @staticmethod
    def f(arg1, arg2, ...): ...

The @staticmethod form is a function decorator.
It can be called either on the class (such as C.f()) or on an instance (such as C().f()). 
The instance is ignored except for its class.
Static methods in Python are similar to those found in Java or C++.

For more info on static vs class methods, please visit:

@static method vs class method

Making a list with unique element from a list with duplicate elements

Iterating the list is not a desirable solution. The right answer should look like this:

>>> dup_list = [1,2,3,4,4,4,5,1,2,7,8,8,10]
>>> unique_list = list(set(dup_list))
>>> print unique_list
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10]
>>> 

Name the functional approach that Python is taking.

Python provides the following:

  1. map(aFunction, aSequence)
  2. filter(aFunction, aSequence)
  3. reduce(aFunction, aSequence)
  4. lambda
  5. list comprehension

These functions are all convenience features in that they can be written in Python fairly easily. Functional programming is all about expressions. We may say that the Functional programming is an expression oriented programming.

What is map?

The syntax of map is:

map(aFunction, aSequence)

The first argument is a function to be executed for all the elements of the iterable given as the second argument. If the function given takes in more than 1 arguments, then many iterables are given.

>>> def cubic(x):
	return x*x*x

>>> items = [x for x in range(11) if x % 2 == 0]
>>> list(map(cubic, items))
[0, 8, 64, 216, 512, 1000]
>>>
>>> list(map(lambda x,y: x*y, [1,2,3], [4,5,6]))
[4, 10, 18]
>>> 

map is similar to list comprehension but is more limited because it requires a function instead of an arbitrary expression.

What is filter and reduce?

Just for comparison purpose, in the following example, we will include map as well.

>>> integers = [ x for x in range(11)]
>>> filter(lambda x: x % 2 == 0, integers)
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10]
>>> map(lambda x: x**2, integers)
[0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, 100]
>>> reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, integers)
55
>>> 

In the above example, we defined a simple list of integer values, then we use the standard functions filter(), map() and reduce() to do various things with that list. All of the three functions expect two arguments: A function and a list.
In the first example, filter() calls our lambda function for each element of the list, and returns a new list that contains only those elements for which the function returned “True”. In this case, we get a list of all even numbers.
In the second example, map() is used to convert our list. The given function is called for every element in the original list, and a new list is created which contains the return values from our lambda function. In this case, it computes x^2 for every element.
Finally, reduce() is somewhat special. The function for this one must accept two arguments (x and y), not just one. The function is called with the first two elements from the list, then with the result of that call and the third element, and so on, until all of the list elements have been handled. This means that our function is called n-1 times if the list contains n elements. The return value of the last call is the result of the reduce() construct. In the above example, it simply adds the arguments, so we get the sum of all elements.

*args and **kwargs

Putting *args and/or **kwargs as the last items in our function definition’s argument list allows that function to accept an arbitrary number of anonymous and/or keyword arguments.
Those arguments are called Keyword Arguments. Actually, they are place holders for multiple arguments, and they are useful especially when we need to pass a different number of arguments each time we call the function.

We may want to use *args when we’re not sure how many arguments might be passed to our function, i.e. it allows us to pass an arbitrary number of arguments to your function as shown in the example below:

Let’s make a function that sums of all numbers. It should work for bo the inputs: 1,2,3,4,5 as separate args and as a list [1,2,3,4,5]:

def fn(<strong>*</strong>args):
	ans = 0 
	for x in args:
		ans += x
	return ans

print(fn(1,2,3,4,5))
print(fn(<strong>*</strong>[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]))
print(fn(<strong>*</strong>range(1,6)))

The keyword arguments is a special name=value syntax in function calls that specifies passing by name. It is often used to provide configuration options.

>>> def kargs_function(<strong>**</strong>kargs):
	for k,v in kargs.items():
		print (k,v)

>>> kargs_function(<strong>**</strong>{'uno':'one','dos':'two','tres':'three'})
('dos', 'two')
('tres', 'three')
('uno', 'one')
>>>
>>> kargs_function(dos='two', tres='three', uno='one')
('dos', 'two')
('tres', 'three')
('uno', 'one')
>>> 

For more details, please visit *args and **kwargs – Collecting and Unpacking Arguments.

mutable vs immutable

The content of objects of immutable types cannot be changed after they are created.

immutablemutable
tuple, frozen set, int, float, strlist, set, dict, byte array

Difference between remove, del and pop on lists

To remove a list element, we can use either the del statement if we know exactly which element(s) we are deleting or the remove() method if we do not know.

list.remove(element), del list(index), list.pop(index)

remove() removes the first matching value, not a specific index:

>>> a = [5,6,7,7,8]
>>> a.remove(7)
>>> a
[5, 6, 7, 8]

Both del and pop work on index:

>>> a = [5,6,7,7,8]
>>> del a[1]
>>> a
[5, 7, 7, 8]

>>> a = [5,6,7,7,8]
>>> a.pop(1)
6
>>> a
[5, 7, 7, 8]

>>> a = [5,6,7,7,8]
>>> a.pop(a.index(6)) # get the index for 6
6
>>> a
[5, 7, 7, 8]

Join with new line

Given a list of string, [‘Black’, ‘holes’, ‘are’, ‘where’, ‘God’, ‘divided’, ‘by’, ‘zero’], print each word in a new line:

>>> s = ['Black', 'holes', 'are', 'where', 'God', 'divided', 'by', 'zero']
>>> print '\n'.join(s)
Black
holes
are
where
God
divided
by
zero

Python Tkinter

Graphical User Interface(GUI) is a form of user interface which allows users to interact with computers through visual indicators using items such as icons, menus, windows, etc. It has advantages over the Command Line Interface(CLI) where users interact with computers by writing commands using keyboard only and whose usage is more difficult than GUI.

What is Tkinter?

Tkinter is the inbuilt python module that is used to create GUI applications. It is one of the most commonly used modules for creating GUI applications in Python as it is simple and easy to work with. You don’t need to worry about the installation of the Tkinter module separately as it comes with Python already. It gives an object-oriented interface to the Tk GUI toolkit.

Some other Python Libraries available for creating our own GUI applications areKivyPython QtwxPython

Among all Tkinter is most widely used

What are Widgets?

Widgets in Tkinter are the elements of GUI application which provides various controls (such as Labels, Buttons, ComboBoxes, CheckBoxes, MenuBars, RadioButtons and many more) to users to interact with the application.

Fundamental structure of tkinter program



Basic Tkinter Widgets:

WIDGETSDESCRIPTION
LabelIt is used to display text or image on the screen
ButtonIt is used to add buttons to your application
CanvasIt is used to draw pictures and others layouts like texts, graphics etc.
ComboBoxIt contains a down arrow to select from list of available options
CheckButtonIt displays a number of options to the user as toggle buttons from which user can select any number of options.
RadiButtonIt is used to implement one-of-many selection as it allows only one option to be selected
EntryIt is used to input single line text entry from user
FrameIt is used as container to hold and organize the widgets
MessageIt works same as that of label and refers to multi-line and non-editable text
ScaleIt is used to provide a graphical slider which allows to select any value from that scale
ScrollbarIt is used to scroll down the contents. It provides a slide controller.
SpinBoxIt is allows user to select from given set of values
TextIt allows user to edit multiline text and format the way it has to be displayed
MenuIt is used to create all kinds of menu used by an application

Python Selenium

Selenium is a powerful tool for controlling web browser through program. It is functional for all browsers, works on all major OS and its scripts are written in various languages i.e Python, Java, C#, etc, we will be working with Python. Selenium has four major components – Selenium IDE, Selenium RC, Selenium Web driver, Selenium GRID.

Components-of-Selenium

Selenium Basics

  • Components
  • Features
  • Applications
  • Limitations

Components

Selenium has been in the industry for a long time and used by automation testers all around the globe.
Let’s check the four major components of Selenium

Selenium IDE

Selenium IDE (Integrated Development Environment) is the major tool in the Selenium Suite. It is a complete integrated development environment (IDE) for Selenium tests. It is implemented as a Firefox Add-On and as a Chrome Extension. It allows for recording, editing and debugging of functional tests. It was previously known as Selenium Recorder. Selenium-IDE was originally created by Shinya Kasatani and donated to the Selenium project in 2006. Selenium IDE was previously little-maintained. Selenium IDE began being actively maintained in 2018.

Scripts may be automatically recorded and edited manually providing autocompletion support and the ability to move commands around quickly. Scripts are recorded in Selenese, a special test scripting language for Selenium. Selenese provides commands for performing actions in a browser (click a link, select an option) and for retrieving data from the resulting pages.

Selenium RC (Remote control)

Selenium Remote Control (RC) is a server, written in Java, that accepts commands for the browser via HTTP. RC makes it possible to write automated tests for a web application in any programming language, which allows for better integration of Selenium in existing unit test frameworks. To make writing tests easier, Selenium project currently provides client drivers for PHP, Python, Ruby, .NET, Perl and Java. The Java driver can also be used with JavaScript (via the Rhino engine). An instance of selenium RC server is needed to launch html test case – which means that the port should be different for each parallel run. However, for Java/PHP test case only one Selenium RC instance needs to be running continuously.

Selenium Web Driver

Selenium WebDriver is the successor to Selenium RC. Selenium WebDriver accepts commands (sent in Selenese, or via a Client API) and sends them to a browser. This is implemented through a browser-specific browser driver, which sends commands to a browser and retrieves results. Most browser drivers actually launch and access a browser application (such as Firefox, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, Safari, or Microsoft Edge); there is also an HtmlUnit browser driver, which simulates a browser using the headless browser HtmlUnit.

Selenium WebDriver does not need a special server to execute tests. Instead, the WebDriver directly starts a browser instance and controls it. However, Selenium Grid can be used with WebDriver to execute tests on remote systems (see below). Where possible, WebDriver uses native operating system level functionality rather than browser-based JavaScript commands to drive the browser. This bypasses problems with subtle differences between native and JavaScript commands, including security restrictions.

Selenium GRID

Selenium Grid is a server that allows tests to use web browser instances running on remote machines. With Selenium Grid, one server acts as the hub. Tests contact the hub to obtain access to browser instances. The hub has a list of servers that provide access to browser instances (WebDriver nodes), and lets tests use these instances. Selenium Grid allows running tests in parallel on multiple machines and to manage different browser versions and browser configurations centrally (instead of in each individual test).

The ability to run tests on remote browser instances is useful to spread the load of testing across several machines and to run tests in browsers running on different platforms or operating systems. The latter is particularly useful in cases where not all browsers to be used for testing can run on the same platform.

Python OpenCV

OpenCV is one of the most popular computer vision libraries. If you want to start your journey in the field of computer vision, then a thorough understanding of the concepts of OpenCV is of paramount importance.
In this article, I will try to introduce the most basic and important concepts of OpenCV in an intuitive manner.
This article will cover the following topics:

  1. Reading an image
  2. Extracting the RGB values of a pixel
  3. Extracting the Region of Interest (ROI)
  4. Resizing the Image
  5. Rotating the Image
  6. Drawing a Rectangle
  7. Displaying text

This is the original image that we will manipulate throughout the course of this article.

Original Image

Let’s start with the simple task of reading an image using OpenCV.

Reading an image

Importing the OpenCV library
 import cv2 
 Reading the image using imread() function
 image = cv2.imread('image.png') 
 Extracting the height and width of an image
 h, w = image.shape[:2] 
 Displaying the height and width
 print("Height = {}, Width = {}".format(h, w)) 

Now we will focus on extracting the RGB values of an individual pixel.
Note – OpenCV arranges the channels in BGR order. So the 0th value will correspond to Blue pixel and not Red.

Extracting the RGB values of a pixel

Extracting RGB values.
 Here we have randomly chosen a pixel
 by passing in 100, 100 for height and width.
 (B, G, R) = image[100, 100] 
 Displaying the pixel values
 print("R = {}, G = {}, B = {}".format(R, G, B)) 
 We can also pass the channel to extract
 the value for a specific channel
 B = image[100, 100, 0] 
 print("B = {}".format(B)) 
Region Of Interest

Python MongoDB

MongoDB Python | Insert and Update Data

Prerequisites : MongoDB Python Basics
We would first understand how to insert a document/entry in a collection of a database. Then we would work on how to update an existing document in MongoDB using pymongo library in python. The update commands helps us to update the query data inserted already in MongoDB database collection.

Insert data

We would first insert data in MongoDB.

Step 1 – Establishing Connection: Port number Default: 27017conn = MongoClient(‘localhost’, port-number)If using default port-number i.e. 27017. Alternate connection method:conn = MongoClient()

Step 2 – Create Database or Switch to Existing Database:db = conn.dabasenameCreate a collection or Switch to existing collection:

collection = db.collection_name

Step 3 – Insert : To Insert Data create a dictionary object and insert data in database. Method used to insert data: insert_one() or insert_many()After insert to find the documents inside a collection we use find() command. The find() method issues a query to retrieve data from a collection in MongoDB. All queries in MongoDB have the scope of a single collection.
Note : ObjectId is different for every entry in database collection.
Let us understand insert of data with help on code:

# Python code to illustrate 
# inserting data in MongoDB 
from pymongo import MongoClient 
  
try: 
    conn = MongoClient() 
    print("Connected successfully!!!") 
except:   
    print("Could not connect to MongoDB") 
  
# database 
db = conn.database 
  
# Created or Switched to collection names: my_gfg_collection 
collection = db.my_gfg_collection 
  
emp_rec1 = { 
        "name":"Mr.Geek", 
        "eid":24, 
        "location":"delhi"
        } 
emp_rec2 = { 
        "name":"Mr.Shaurya", 
        "eid":14, 
        "location":"delhi"
        } 
  
# Insert Data 
rec_id1 = collection.insert_one(emp_rec1) 
rec_id2 = collection.insert_one(emp_rec2) 
  
print("Data inserted with record ids",rec_id1," ",rec_id2) 
  
# Printing the data inserted 
cursor = collection.find() 
for record in cursor: 
    print(record) 
Connected successfully!!!
Data inserted with record ids    
{'_id': ObjectId('5a02227b37b8552becf5ed2a'), 
'name': 'Mr.Geek', 'eid': 24, 'location': 'delhi'}
{'_id': ObjectId('5a02227c37b8552becf5ed2b'), 'name':
'Mr.Shaurya', 'eid': 14, 'location': 'delhi'}

Updating data in MongoDB

Methods used: update_one() and update_many()
Parameters passed:
+ a filter document to match the documents to update
+ an update document to specify the modification to perform
+ an optional upsert parameter

# Python code to illustrate 
# updating data in MongoDB 
# with Data of employee with id:24 
from pymongo import MongoClient 
  
try: 
    conn = MongoClient() 
    print("Connected successfully!!!") 
except:   
    print("Could not connect to MongoDB") 
  
# database 
db = conn.database 
  
# Created or Switched to collection names: my_gfg_collection 
collection = db.my_gfg_collection 
  
# update all the employee data whose eid is 24 
result = collection.update_many( 
        {"eid":24}, 
        { 
                "$set":{ 
                        "name":"Mr.Geeksforgeeks"
                        }, 
                "$currentDate":{"lastModified":True} 
                  
                } 
        ) 
  
  
  
print("Data updated with id",result) 
  
# Print the new record 
cursor = collection.find() 
for record in cursor: 
    print(record) 

Output:

Connected successfully!!!
Data updated with id 
{'_id': ObjectId('5a02227b37b8552becf5ed2a'), 
'name': 'Mr.Geeksforgeeks', 'eid': 24, 'location': 
'delhi', 'lastModified': datetime.datetime(2017, 11, 7, 21, 19, 9, 698000)}
{'_id': ObjectId('5a02227c37b8552becf5ed2b'), 'name': 
'Mr.Shaurya', 'eid': 14, 'location': 'delhi'}

To find number of documents or entries in collection the are updated use.

 print(result.matched_count) 

Python MySQL

Python MySQL – Create Database

Last Updated: 09-03-2020

Python Database API ( Application Program Interface ) is the Database interface for the standard Python. This standard is adhered to by most Python Database interfaces. There are various Database servers supported by Python Database such as MySQL, GadFly, mSQL, PostgreSQL, Microsoft SQL Server 2000, Informix, Interbase, Oracle, Sybase etc. To connect with MySQL database server from Python, we need to import the mysql.connector interface.

Syntax:

CREATE DATABASE DATABASE_NAME
importing rquired libraries
 import mysql.connector 
 dataBase = mysql.connector.connect( 
 host ="localhost", 
 user ="user", 
 passwd ="gfg"
 ) 
 preparing a cursor object
 cursorObject = dataBase.cursor() 
 creating database
 cursorObject.execute("CREATE DATABASE geeks4geeks") 

Output:

python-mysql-create-db

The above program illustrates the creation of MySQL database geeks4geeks in which host-name is localhost, the username is user and password is gfg.

Let’s suppose we want to create a table in the database, then we need to connect to a database. Below is a program to create a table in the geeks4geeks database which was created in the above program.

importing required library
 import mysql.connector 
 connecting to the database
 dataBase = mysql.connector.connect( 
                     host = "localhost", 
                     user = "user", 
                     passwd = "gfg", 
                     database = "geeks4geeks" ) 
 preparing a cursor object
 cursorObject = dataBase.cursor() 
 creating table
 studentRecord = """CREATE TABLE STUDENT ( 
                 NAME VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL, 
                 BRANCH VARCHAR(50), 
                 ROLL INT NOT NULL, 
                 SECTION VARCHAR(5), 
                 AGE INT, 
                 )"""
 table created
 cursorObject.execute(studentRecord) 
 disconnecting from server
 dataBase.close() 

Output:

PYTHON-MYSQL-CREATE-DB1

Python CSV

Working with csv files in Python

csv3

This article explains how to load and parse a CSV file in Python.

First of all, what is a CSV ?
CSV (Comma Separated Values) is a simple file format used to store tabular data, such as a spreadsheet or database. A CSV file stores tabular data (numbers and text) in plain text. Each line of the file is a data record. Each record consists of one or more fields, separated by commas. The use of the comma as a field separator is the source of the name for this file format.

For working CSV files in python, there is an inbuilt module called csv.

Reading a CSV file

# importing csv module 
import csv 

# csv file name 
filename = "aapl.csv"

# initializing the titles and rows list 
fields = [] 
rows = [] 

# reading csv file 
with open(filename, 'r') as csvfile: 
	# creating a csv reader object 
	csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile) 
	
	# extracting field names through first row 
	fields = next(csvreader) 

	# extracting each data row one by one 
	for row in csvreader: 
		rows.append(row) 

	# get total number of rows 
	print("Total no. of rows: %d"%(csvreader.line_num)) 

# printing the field names 
print('Field names are:' + ', '.join(field for field in fields)) 

# printing first 5 rows 
print('\nFirst 5 rows are:\n') 
for row in rows[:5]: 
	# parsing each column of a row 
	for col in row: 
		print("%10s"%col), 
	print('\n') 

The output of above program looks like this:

csv1

The above example uses a CSV file aapl.csv which can be downloaded from here.
Run this program with the aapl.csv file in same directory.

Let us try to understand this piece of code.

  • with open(filename, ‘r’) as csvfile: csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile)Here, we first open the CSV file in READ mode. The file object is named as csvfile. The file object is converted to csv.reader object. We save the csv.reader object as csvreader.
  • fields = csvreader.next()csvreader is an iterable object. Hence, .next() method returns the current row and advances the iterator to the next row. Since the first row of our csv file contains the headers (or field names), we save them in a list called fields.
  • for row in csvreader: rows.append(row)Now, we iterate through remaining rows using a for loop. Each row is appended to a list called rows. If you try to print each row, one can find that row is nothing but a list containing all the field values.
  • print(“Total no. of rows: %d”%(csvreader.line_num))csvreader.line_num is nothing but a counter which returns the number of rows which have been iterated.

Writing to a CSV file

# importing the csv module 
import csv 

# field names 
fields = ['Name', 'Branch', 'Year', 'CGPA'] 

# data rows of csv file 
rows = [ ['Nikhil', 'COE', '2', '9.0'], 
		['Sanchit', 'COE', '2', '9.1'], 
		['Aditya', 'IT', '2', '9.3'], 
		['Sagar', 'SE', '1', '9.5'], 
		['Prateek', 'MCE', '3', '7.8'], 
		['Sahil', 'EP', '2', '9.1']] 

# name of csv file 
filename = "university_records.csv"

# writing to csv file 
with open(filename, 'w') as csvfile: 
	# creating a csv writer object 
	csvwriter = csv.writer(csvfile) 
	
	# writing the fields 
	csvwriter.writerow(fields) 
	
	# writing the data rows 
	csvwriter.writerows(rows)

Let us try to understand the above code in pieces.

  • fields and rows have been already defined. fields is a list containing all the field names. rows is a list of lists. Each row is a list containing the field values of that row.
  • with open(filename, ‘w’) as csvfile: csvwriter = csv.writer(csvfile)Here, we first open the CSV file in WRITE mode. The file object is named as csvfile. The file object is converted to csv.writer object. We save the csv.writer object as csvwriter.
  • csvwriter.writerow(fields)Now we use writerow method to write the first row which is nothing but the field names.
  • csvwriter.writerows(rows)We use writerows method to write multiple rows at once.

Writing a dictionary to a CSV file

# importing the csv module 
import csv 

# my data rows as dictionary objects 
mydict =[{'branch': 'COE', 'cgpa': '9.0', 'name': 'Nikhil', 'year': '2'}, 
		{'branch': 'COE', 'cgpa': '9.1', 'name': 'Sanchit', 'year': '2'}, 
		{'branch': 'IT', 'cgpa': '9.3', 'name': 'Aditya', 'year': '2'}, 
		{'branch': 'SE', 'cgpa': '9.5', 'name': 'Sagar', 'year': '1'}, 
		{'branch': 'MCE', 'cgpa': '7.8', 'name': 'Prateek', 'year': '3'}, 
		{'branch': 'EP', 'cgpa': '9.1', 'name': 'Sahil', 'year': '2'}] 

# field names 
fields = ['name', 'branch', 'year', 'cgpa'] 

# name of csv file 
filename = "university_records.csv"

# writing to csv file 
with open(filename, 'w') as csvfile: 
	# creating a csv dict writer object 
	writer = csv.DictWriter(csvfile, fieldnames = fields) 
	
	# writing headers (field names) 
	writer.writeheader() 
	
	# writing data rows 
	writer.writerows(mydict) 

In this example, we write a dictionary mydict to a CSV file.

  • with open(filename, ‘w’) as csvfile: writer = csv.DictWriter(csvfile, fieldnames = fields)Here, the file object (csvfile) is converted to a DictWriter object.
    Here, we specify the fieldnames as an argument.
  • writer.writeheader()writeheader method simply writes the first row of your csv file using the pre-specified fieldnames.
  • writer.writerows(mydict)writerows method simply writes all the rows but in each row, it writes only the values(not keys).

So, in the end, our CSV file looks like this:

csv2

Important Points:

  • In csv modules, an optional dialect parameter can be given which is used to define a set of parameters specific to a particular CSV format. By default, csv module uses excel dialect which makes them compatible with excel spreadsheets. You can define your own dialect using register_dialect method.
    Here is an example:
     csv.register_dialect(
    'mydialect',
    delimiter = ',',
    quotechar = '"',
    doublequote = True,
    skipinitialspace = True,
    lineterminator = '\r\n',
    quoting = csv.QUOTE_MINIMAL)

Now, while defining a csv.reader or csv.writer object, we can specify the dialect like
this:

csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, dialect='mydialect')
  • Now, consider that a CSV file looks like this in plain-text:
    We notice that the delimiter is not a comma but a semi-colon. Also, the rows are separated by two newlines instead of one. In such cases, we can specify the delimiter and line terminator as follows:csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter = ';', lineterminator = '\n\n')

Python JSON

Introduction of JSON in Python :
The full-form of JSON is JavaScript Object Notation. It means that a script (executable) file which is made of text in a programming language, is used to store and transfer the data. Python supports JSON through a built-in package called json. To use this feature, we import the json package in Python script. The text in JSON is done through quoted string which contains value in key-value mapping within { }. It is similar to the dictionary in Python. JSON shows an API similar to users of Standard Library marshal and pickle modules and Python natively supports JSON features.

Python program showing
 use of json package
 import json 
 {key:value mapping}
 a ={"name":"John", 
 "age":31, 
     "Salary":25000} 
 conversion to JSON done by dumps() function
 b = json.dumps(a) 
 printing the output
 print(b) 

Output:

{"age": 31, "Salary": 25000, "name": "John"}

As you can see, JSON supports primitive types, like strings and numbers, as well as nested lists, tuples and objects.

Python program showing that
 json support different primitive
 types
 import json 
 list conversion to Array
 print(json.dumps(['Welcome', "to", "GeeksforGeeks"])) 
 tuple conversion to Array
 print(json.dumps(("Welcome", "to", "GeeksforGeeks"))) 
 string conversion to String
 print(json.dumps("Hi")) 
 int conversion to Number
 print(json.dumps(123)) 
 float conversion to Number
 print(json.dumps(23.572)) 
 Boolean conversion to their respective values
 print(json.dumps(True)) 
 print(json.dumps(False)) 
 None value to null
 print(json.dumps(None)) 

Output:

["Welcome", "to", "GeeksforGeeks"]
["Welcome", "to", "GeeksforGeeks"]
"Hi"
123
23.572
true
false
null

Python Django

Django is a Python-based web framework which allows you to quickly create web application without all of the installation or dependency problems that you normally will find with other frameworks.
When you’re building a website, you always need a similar set of components: a way to handle user authentication (signing up, signing in, signing out), a management panel for your website, forms, a way to upload files, etc. Django gives you ready-made components to use.

django-basics

Why Django?

  • Django is a rapid web development framework that can be used to develop fully fleshed web applications in a short period of time.
  • It’s very easy to switch database in Django framework.
  • It has built-in admin interface which makes easy to work with it.
  • Django is fully functional framework that requires nothing else.
  • It has thousands of additional packages available.
  • It is very scalable. For more visit When to Use Django? Comparison with other Development Stacks ?

Django architecture

Django is based on MVT (Model-View-Template) architecture. MVT is a software design pattern for developing a web application.

MVT Structure has the following three parts –

Model: Model is going to act as the interface of your data. It is responsible for maintaining data. It is the logical data structure behind the entire application and is represented by a database (generally relational databases such as MySql, Postgres).